Tuesday, April 1, 2008

"Fields and Yellow Flowers"

Here is one more painting using a pre mixed palette of colors.
This painting is from last Friday when I went painting with my friend Guy Corriero. I painted from a spot that was slightly elevated from where I shot this photo. That way I could get the receding fields read as larger shapes.


I focused on the stacks and middle trees and moved elements from the edges inwards for a better design on my 6x8 panel.


I sketched this design lightly with vine charcoal, then mixed.


A close up of the palette. The color of the yellow flowers is missing from this shot. That blue-gray pile near my cad. red and yellow was a missed attempt, but I later used it in other mixes.


With time to think about it, I changed my design a bit. Less foreground and moved it all to the right and a bit closer.


The finished piece. "Fields and Yellow Flowers", 6" x 8" oil on board, 2008
Private Collection


The scene again to compare to the finish.


Detail 1.


Detail 2.

I was happy with the result. There is a chance that I might paint a larger piece from this. I have a few ideas how I would change things just a bit, but I don't want to mess with this one and lose the freshness and spontaneity of the painting. I've learned that the hard way. I always think that I can just "fix" a few things, but almost every time I wish that I had left it alone.

22 comments:

Jennifer said...

Hi Frank- I love seeing the finish compared to the actual scene. Thanks for sharing.

It's so hard not to keep tweaking things! How many times have I banged my head against that wall...

Dean H. said...

Love the freshness and spontaneity!
Highly informative...
Thanks for the great post!

Frank Gardner said...

Hi Jennifer. Oh, I hate when I over work a piece, I always feel so stupid.

Frank Gardner said...

Thanks Dean! I appreciate your feedback on these posts.

mike rooney said...

thanks for taking the time to do these posts. you have made a positive impact on the way i'll attack blockins from now on. what i like best about this new (for me) method is the ability to compare color, value, and saturation issues seperate from the mark making ones. thanks dude.keep up the great blog!

Larry Seiler said...

simple but all there, succinctly...economically, aesthetically represented!!

well done

Frank Gardner said...

My pleasure Mike. I learn something myself from having to gather it all together into words that make sense to others.

Frank Gardner said...

Thanks Larry, I appreciate your choice of words.

theysaywordscanbleed said...

It's a lovely painting!

Arlene,
Lakewood florist

Kathryn Law said...

Wow, this is beautiful. The way the yellow flowers are represented is so effective. Luminous color and luscious paint application, and I especially love the great detail shots. As Mike said, thanks so much for doing these posts, I learn so much each time.

Frank Gardner said...

Thanks Arlene!

Frank Gardner said...

Thanks a lot Kathryn.
I've picked my five random colors. This will be a real challenge. They were stashed away in my paint box for a reason.

Don Gray said...

Great post, Frank. It's fun and instructive to see the photos and to see what kind of editing takes place in the final painting. Nice atmosphere and spontaneous character in this painting.

Jack Riddle said...

FRank--I'm following these posts closely. It's like getting a whole other workshop. I've approached my recent work like this--even though it's in the studio. But it's good practice for when we can get outside. These last two or three of yours also demonstrate how to "see" a painting from relatively bland settings. But then you have all that gorgeous color down there! Post more...

Mike said...

Hey Bud!! Just wanted you to know that I am pokin around in here and lovin' what I am seein'

Sure do miss prowling around in the blogs, but right now time is just scarce. I'll be back soon.

Hope all's well w you!

mike rooney said...

frank

keep meaning to ask you what that tiny spot of dark color i keep seeing up in the far right corner of the palette is? its in all the palette shots.
also looks like youre using split primary yellow and red... only one blue? any reason. most (including me- being at the beach i need warm and cool blues quick) that use split primary still use two or more blues (some i know use 4 blues including turquoise).
still picking your brain! it never ends does it LOL thanks my friend...

Eric Orchard said...

Really wonderful.
I love it when your abstract sensabilities show through in your figurative work. You have an amazing sense of pattern and colour.

Frank Gardner said...

Thanks Don, I really appreciate that you've been checking these out and enjoying them.
I had hoped that showing the photo of the scene and how I edited it would be interesting.

Frank Gardner said...

Hi Jack. Thanks for checking in.
Gorgeous, but subtle color, yes. But down there by the lake is about the only spot right now to get these yellows and greens.
I've got an interesting one that I'm working on now. I hope to get it up tonight.

Frank Gardner said...

Mike B., it is great to see you back amigo.
Thanks for diggin around in here and taking the time to comment. I know you are busy.
Things are great here. How 'bout you?

Frank Gardner said...

Mike R., that tiny dark spot?
That's a secret.
I guess I should explain my palette sometime for those of you who don't know why I use what I do.
It is my phthalo blue.
I keep it up there because it is sneaky and gets into everything if I'm not careful. It is my blue that has yellow in it and the ultramarine is my blue that has red in it. I'll explain the colors in a future post.
Thanks for asking.

Frank Gardner said...

Hi Eric, good to hear from you.
Thanks for picking up on the abstract feeling in some of these looser ones. I appreciate you thoughts.